FAQ: What Does Translation Mean In Science?

What is the translation of DNA?

DNA translation is the term used to describe the process of protein synthesis by ribosomes in the cytoplasm or endoplasmic reticulum. tRNAs carry particular amino acids, which are linked together by the ribosome. In this process, the mRNA is decoded to produce a specific amino acid chain, known as a polypeptide.

What is translation and transcription?

Transcription and translation take the information in DNA and use it to produce proteins. Transcription uses a strand of DNA as a template to build a molecule called RNA. During translation, the RNA molecule created in the transcription process delivers information from the DNA to the protein-building machines.

What does translation involve in biology?

In molecular biology and genetics, translation is the process in which ribosomes in the cytoplasm or endoplasmic reticulum synthesize proteins after the process of transcription of DNA to RNA in the cell’s nucleus. The entire process is called gene expression.

What are the 3 stages of translation?

Translation of an mRNA molecule by the ribosome occurs in three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination.

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Where does DNA translation occur?

Where Translation Occurs. Within all cells, the translation machinery resides within a specialized organelle called the ribosome. In eukaryotes, mature mRNA molecules must leave the nucleus and travel to the cytoplasm, where the ribosomes are located.

What are the steps of translation?

Steps of Translation There are three major steps to translation: Initiation, Elongation, and Termination. The ribosome is made of two separate subunits: the small subunit and the large subunit.

What is translation process?

Translation is the process of translating the sequence of a messenger RNA (mRNA) molecule to a sequence of amino acids during protein synthesis. The genetic code describes the relationship between the sequence of base pairs in a gene and the corresponding amino acid sequence that it encodes.

Why is translation so important?

Translation is necessary for the spread of information, knowledge, and ideas. It is absolutely necessary for effective and empathetic communication between different cultures. Translation is also the only medium through which people come to know different works that expand their knowledge.

Which best describes the process of translation?

Which best describes the process of translation? A growing protein chain is produced by the process of translation. mRNA brings the code of DNA to the ribosome where it is used to construct a protein.

What are the 6 steps of translation?

What are the Six Steps of Translation in Eukaryotes

  • I. binding of mRNA to ribosome.
  • (ii) Aminoacylation.
  • (iii) Initiation.
  • (iv) Elongation.
  • Step I- Binding of incoming aminoacyl.
  • (v) Termination.
  • (vi) Post-translational modifications.

What is the end result of translation in biology?

The amino acid sequence is the final result of translation, and is known as a polypeptide. Polypeptides can then undergo folding to become functional proteins.

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What is the order of translation?

Translation happens in four stages: activation (make ready), initiation (start), elongation (make longer) and termination (stop). These terms describe the growth of the amino acid chain (polypeptide). Amino acids are brought to ribosomes and assembled into proteins.

What events occur during translation?

Translation: Beginning, middle, and end Elongation (“middle”): in this stage, amino acids are brought to the ribosome by tRNAs and linked together to form a chain. Termination (“end”): in the last stage, the finished polypeptide is released to go and do its job in the cell.

Which does the termination of translation require?

Abstract. Translation termination in eukaryotes occurs in response to a stop codon in the ribosomal A-site and requires two release factors (RFs), eRF1 and eRF3, which bind to the A-site as an eRF1/eRF3/GTP complex with eRF1 responsible for codon recognition.

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